Beauteous Design
Architecture.Fashion.Interiors.Furniture.More.
Beauteous Design
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urbnite:

Line Credenza
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archimodels:

© claudio vilarinho - scholar center calvao - vagos, portugal - 2008
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cjwho:

The Illusion of Light, Palazzo Grassi, Venice by Doug Wheeler | via

Doug Wheeler’s lighting installation, titled D-N SF 12 PG VI, is installed for The Illusion of Light exhibition at Palazzo Grassi – an 18th century residence situated on Venice’s Grand Canal that now hosts contemporary art shows.

Visible on entering the gallery, the re-appropriated atrium space is flanked on two sides by the building’s original stone columns.

The other two edges, floor and roof are replaced with what appears to be just brilliant white light.

When viewed from the entrance hall, it is unclear how far the illuminated area extends up or back and visitors inside the space seem to be suspended in and surrounded by the light.

This disorientation and spatial uncertainty continue when entering the area as white lighting removes the sense of depth and perspective.

"Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration," said a statement from the gallery.

Venturing far enough into the space, it is possible to get into a position facing away from the columns so the light completely fills the field of view.

The effect is created inside a reinforced fibreglass shell, which is coated in titanium dioxide paint and illuminated with LEDs.

The shell curves up gently from the floor to create two walls and a ceiling. Lighting is used to remove the shadows that would usually give away where the surfaces change direction.

The Illusion of Light exhibition was curated by Caroline Bourgeois and continues until 31 December.

Photography: Fulvio Orsenigo

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

The Illusion of Light, Palazzo Grassi, Venice by Doug Wheeler | via

Doug Wheeler’s lighting installation, titled D-N SF 12 PG VI, is installed for The Illusion of Light exhibition at Palazzo Grassi – an 18th century residence situated on Venice’s Grand Canal that now hosts contemporary art shows.

Visible on entering the gallery, the re-appropriated atrium space is flanked on two sides by the building’s original stone columns.

The other two edges, floor and roof are replaced with what appears to be just brilliant white light.

When viewed from the entrance hall, it is unclear how far the illuminated area extends up or back and visitors inside the space seem to be suspended in and surrounded by the light.

This disorientation and spatial uncertainty continue when entering the area as white lighting removes the sense of depth and perspective.

"Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration," said a statement from the gallery.

Venturing far enough into the space, it is possible to get into a position facing away from the columns so the light completely fills the field of view.

The effect is created inside a reinforced fibreglass shell, which is coated in titanium dioxide paint and illuminated with LEDs.

The shell curves up gently from the floor to create two walls and a ceiling. Lighting is used to remove the shadows that would usually give away where the surfaces change direction.

The Illusion of Light exhibition was curated by Caroline Bourgeois and continues until 31 December.

Photography: Fulvio Orsenigo

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

The Illusion of Light, Palazzo Grassi, Venice by Doug Wheeler | via

Doug Wheeler’s lighting installation, titled D-N SF 12 PG VI, is installed for The Illusion of Light exhibition at Palazzo Grassi – an 18th century residence situated on Venice’s Grand Canal that now hosts contemporary art shows.

Visible on entering the gallery, the re-appropriated atrium space is flanked on two sides by the building’s original stone columns.

The other two edges, floor and roof are replaced with what appears to be just brilliant white light.

When viewed from the entrance hall, it is unclear how far the illuminated area extends up or back and visitors inside the space seem to be suspended in and surrounded by the light.

This disorientation and spatial uncertainty continue when entering the area as white lighting removes the sense of depth and perspective.

"Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration," said a statement from the gallery.

Venturing far enough into the space, it is possible to get into a position facing away from the columns so the light completely fills the field of view.

The effect is created inside a reinforced fibreglass shell, which is coated in titanium dioxide paint and illuminated with LEDs.

The shell curves up gently from the floor to create two walls and a ceiling. Lighting is used to remove the shadows that would usually give away where the surfaces change direction.

The Illusion of Light exhibition was curated by Caroline Bourgeois and continues until 31 December.

Photography: Fulvio Orsenigo

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

The Illusion of Light, Palazzo Grassi, Venice by Doug Wheeler | via

Doug Wheeler’s lighting installation, titled D-N SF 12 PG VI, is installed for The Illusion of Light exhibition at Palazzo Grassi – an 18th century residence situated on Venice’s Grand Canal that now hosts contemporary art shows.

Visible on entering the gallery, the re-appropriated atrium space is flanked on two sides by the building’s original stone columns.

The other two edges, floor and roof are replaced with what appears to be just brilliant white light.

When viewed from the entrance hall, it is unclear how far the illuminated area extends up or back and visitors inside the space seem to be suspended in and surrounded by the light.

This disorientation and spatial uncertainty continue when entering the area as white lighting removes the sense of depth and perspective.

"Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration," said a statement from the gallery.

Venturing far enough into the space, it is possible to get into a position facing away from the columns so the light completely fills the field of view.

The effect is created inside a reinforced fibreglass shell, which is coated in titanium dioxide paint and illuminated with LEDs.

The shell curves up gently from the floor to create two walls and a ceiling. Lighting is used to remove the shadows that would usually give away where the surfaces change direction.

The Illusion of Light exhibition was curated by Caroline Bourgeois and continues until 31 December.

Photography: Fulvio Orsenigo

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

The Illusion of Light, Palazzo Grassi, Venice by Doug Wheeler | via

Doug Wheeler’s lighting installation, titled D-N SF 12 PG VI, is installed for The Illusion of Light exhibition at Palazzo Grassi – an 18th century residence situated on Venice’s Grand Canal that now hosts contemporary art shows.

Visible on entering the gallery, the re-appropriated atrium space is flanked on two sides by the building’s original stone columns.

The other two edges, floor and roof are replaced with what appears to be just brilliant white light.

When viewed from the entrance hall, it is unclear how far the illuminated area extends up or back and visitors inside the space seem to be suspended in and surrounded by the light.

This disorientation and spatial uncertainty continue when entering the area as white lighting removes the sense of depth and perspective.

"Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration," said a statement from the gallery.

Venturing far enough into the space, it is possible to get into a position facing away from the columns so the light completely fills the field of view.

The effect is created inside a reinforced fibreglass shell, which is coated in titanium dioxide paint and illuminated with LEDs.

The shell curves up gently from the floor to create two walls and a ceiling. Lighting is used to remove the shadows that would usually give away where the surfaces change direction.

The Illusion of Light exhibition was curated by Caroline Bourgeois and continues until 31 December.

Photography: Fulvio Orsenigo

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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enochliew:

Dr Derm Clinic by Atelier Central Arquitectos
Smooth lines were intentionally and appropriately incorporated in the details of this dermatology clinic.  
enochliew:

Dr Derm Clinic by Atelier Central Arquitectos
Smooth lines were intentionally and appropriately incorporated in the details of this dermatology clinic.  
enochliew:

Dr Derm Clinic by Atelier Central Arquitectos
Smooth lines were intentionally and appropriately incorporated in the details of this dermatology clinic.  
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archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
archatlas:

Centro de formación e interpretación de valores culturales y etnográficos del Mandeo (Mandeo Ethnographic and Cultural Centre) Barge Bouza Arquitectos
Images by Héctor Santos-Díez | BisImages
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thecreativesense:

Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
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cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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architorturedsouls:

What Categorize the City and Me / ON design partners
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